Direct Flight to Egilsstadir - Gateway to the East & North

Now available for October 2017

iceland north godafoss summer

In October 2017, travellers from the UK will be able to fly directly to Egilsstadir, East Iceland and out via Keflavik, Iceland’s main international airport, and vice versa. These flights are exclusive to Discover the World, and is the only direct flight between the two locations, offering easy and convenient access to one of Iceland's most spectacular and lesser visited regions, whilst combining the better known highlights closer to Reykjavik.

Flying into Egilsstadir will allow you to experience the stunning and remote East Fjords where nearby waterfalls are plentiful. You can visit Hengifoss, Iceland’s third tallest waterfall at an impressive 128 metres or the famous Dettifoss, Europe’s most powerful. Flying into Egilsstadir brings you closer to Europe’s largest icecap, Vatnajokull, which feeds the stunning iceberg lagoon, Jokulsarlon and many impressive glacial tongues. Continue along the south coast to the spectacular Skafafell National Park and then towards many of Iceland most popular attractions, including the coastline at Reynishverfi and Dyrholaey and the Golden Circle.

To find out more take a look at our suggested itineraries below or contact one of our dedicated Iceland Travel Specialists.

At a glance:

• Exclusive to Discover the World in the UK
• Flights from Gatwick in October half term 2017
• Convenience of flying direct into the heart of the Icelandic countryside
• October 2017 price: From £850 per person. Based on a 5 day trip / 4 night trip , full board, sleeping bag accommodation, 40 students and 4 staff members

5 Day South to East Iceland

Day 1

Fly UK to Keflavik - Reykjavik tour or Reykjanes Peninsula or Blue Lagoon – Reykjavik. Fly from the UK to Keflavik before partaking in a choice of activities. You may like to spend time in Reykjavik sightseeing and shopping or possibly exploring the geothermal wonderland of the Reykjanes Peninsula to see bubbling mud pools and visit the junction in the earth’s crust between the European and American tectonic plates. Or you could simply relax and take a dip in the milky blue geothermal waters of Iceland’s most famous attraction, the Blue Lagoon.

Day 2

Thingvellir – Geysir – Gullfoss - Seljalandsfoss – Skogafoss – Vik. Meet your guide before embarking on an adventurous day exploring the Golden Circle and the best of the south of Iceland. First up is the rift valley at Thingvellir, where the divergent North American and Eurasian tectonic plates can be found, pulling apart at an average rate of 2.5cm per year – it is also where Iceland's national assembly, the Althing, was set up in 930AD. Then on to Geysir, where Iceland’s most reliable geyser Strokkur spouts every 5 minutes or so. Nearby, witness the immense power of the two-tiered waterfall Gullfoss, one of Iceland’s most beautiful which flows from a glacier into a rift valley. You’ll then head south and visit Seljalandsfoss, a narrow plunge waterfall where the water plummets over a former sea cliff, far enough away from the bedrock to allow you to walk behind it. Nearby in contrast, Skogar is a broad, block waterfall that thunders 60m over a cliff edge. Continue to black sand beaches and dunes at Vik, where you’ll also be spending the night in farm stay accommodation.

Day 3

Reynishverfi - Fjadrargljufur – Skeidararjokull – Skaftafell National Park – Svinafellsjokull - Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon – Hofn.See the incredible hexagonal basalt columns and impressive cliffs of Reynishverfi. The coastline between here and Dyrholaey is worthy of study with a variety of features including Iceland’s answer to Durdle Door – an immense natural rock arch. Continue to Fjadrargljufur, a rugged and impressive gorge about 100m deep and 2km long. The gorge runs through hyaloclastite (soft, granular rock) with lava intrusions, the entire formation dating from the Ice Age 2 million years ago.Make a short stop at Skeidararjokull, an outlet glacier of Vatnajokull which has been previously known for its large glacial outburst floods (jokulhlaups) caused by the volcanic activity of the nearby Grisvotn. Next up is Skaftafell National Park, one of Iceland’s primary areas of natural beauty and a geographer’s wonderland. Here you will get to see some of its many natural features including mountains valleys and glaciers, including the impressive Svinafellsjokull, an outlet glacier where natural ice sculptures, ridges and deep crevasses are abundant. The ice here comes spilling down from the highlands and is known for the particularly active advance and retreat of its glacier tongue. Here you might also like to take part in an optional glacier hike, a nice and less busy alternative to glacier hiking on Solheimajokull.There will still be time for more adventure and the next stop is at Iceland’s most famous glacial lagoon. As glaciers retreat they leave behind deep lagoons of glacial melt water - Jokulsarlon is the largest of these lagoons and one of Iceland’s deepest lakes. Icebergs, some as large as houses break off the glacier and gradually drift out to sea – some washing up on the black sand beach nearby – an incredible sight offering excellent photo opportunities.We finish the day by exploring the small fishing town of Hofn, known for its diverse fishing opportunities. Whilst visiting, consider the economic shift from fishing to tourism, evident from the increasing number of hotels, campsites, marked trails and museums.

Day 4

Neskaupstadur and avalanche barrier - hike to Hengifoss – Fljotsdalsstod - Karahnjukar - Egilsstadir
Begin the day by exploring Neskjaupstadur, a thriving fishing port which also boasts the largest population of any of Iceland’s eastern towns. Here you will also see impressive 17m avalanche barriers. Then take a scenic hike to one of the star attractions of the east, Hengifoss waterfall. Here water flows 128m over brown / black strata which was formed as clay became trapped between successive layers of ash and basalt. There is one more stop of the day before you head back to Egilsstadir, The Karahnjukar dam & the Fjotsdalsstod hydroelectric power plant perfectly demonstrate the importance of harnessing power from natural resources in modern day Iceland. Karahnjukar is part of a complex of dams comprising of one main rockfill dam and several smaller dams. At 700m wide and 198m tall, it is the largest in Iceland. The Fljotsdalsstod hydroelectric power plant has an installed power of 690MW and produces 4,600GWh annually, feeding electricity to the aluminium smelter Fjardaal at Reydarfjordur.

Day 5

Seydisfjordur – Egilsstadir. We have one more iconic stop of the Eastern Fjordlands in store for you before you head back on your direct flight to Gatwick from Egilsstadir. Seydisfjordur is a simply stunning hamlet of just 700 people which lies at the bottom of dramatic snowcapped mountains. Marvel at the cascading waterfalls that surround the area and hear from your guide how the area is of such historical importance to Iceland, in particular its harbour which was once a thriving trading centre.

6 Day South, East and North Iceland

Day 1

Fly UK to Keflavik - Reykjavik tour or Reykjanes Peninsula or Blue Lagoon – Reykjavik
Fly from the UK to Keflavik before partaking in a choice of activities. You may like to spend time in Reykjavik sightseeing and shopping or possibly exploring the geothermal wonderland of the Reykjanes Peninsula to see bubbling mud pools and visit the junction in the earth’s crust between the European and American tectonic plates. Or you could simply relax and take a dip in the milky blue geothermal waters of Iceland’s most famous attraction, the Blue Lagoon.

Day 2

Thingvellir – Geysir – Gullfoss – Kerid – Seljalandsfoss – Skogafoss – Vik
Meet your guide before embarking on an adventurous day exploring the Golden Circle and the best of the south of Iceland. First up is the rift valley at Thingvellir, where the divergent North American and Eurasian tectonic plates can be found, pulling apart at an average rate of 2.5cm per year – it is also where Iceland's national assembly, the Althing, was set up in 930AD. Then on to Geysir, where Iceland’s most reliable geyser Strokkur spouts every 5 minutes or so. Nearby, witness the immense power of the two-tiered waterfall Gullfoss, one of Iceland’s most beautiful which flows from a glacier into a rift valley. Continue to Kerid, a dramatic volcanic crater lake, originally believed to have formed by a huge volcanic explosion. More in-depth studies show that Kerid was a cone volcano which erupted and emptied its magma reserve. You’ll then head south and visit Seljalandsfoss, a narrow plunge waterfall where the water plummets over a former sea cliff, far enough away from the bedrock to allow you to walk behind it. Nearby in contrast, Skogar is a broad, block waterfall that thunders 60m over a cliff edge. Continue to black sand beaches and dunes at Vik, where you’ll also be spending the night in farm stay accommodation.

Day 3

Reynishverfi - Fjadrargljufur – Skeidararjokull – Skaftafell National Park – Svinafellsjokull - Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon - Hofn
See the incredible hexagonal basalt columns and impressive cliffs of Reynishverfi. The coastline between here and Dyrholaey is worthy of study with a variety of features including Iceland’s answer to Durdle Door – an immense natural rock arch. Continue to Fjadrargljufur, a rugged and impressive gorge about 100m deep and 2km long. The gorge runs through hyaloclastite (soft, granular rock) with lava intrusions, the entire formation dating from the Ice Age 2 million years ago.
Make a short stop at Skeidararjokull, an outlet glacier of Vatnajokull which has been previously known for its large glacial outburst floods (jokulhlaups) caused by the volcanic activity of the nearby Grisvotn. Next up is Skaftafell National Park, one of Iceland’s primary areas of natural beauty and a geographers wonderland. Here you will get to see some of its many natural features including mountains valleys and glaciers, including the impressive Svinafellsjokull, an outlet glacier where natural ice sculptures, ridges and deep crevasses are abundant. The ice here comes spilling down from the highlands and is known for the particularly active advance and retreat of its glacier tongue. Here you might also like to take part in an optional glacier hike, a nice and less busy alternative to glacier hiking on Solheimajokull.
There will still be time for more adventure and the next stop is at Iceland’s most famous glacial lagoon. As glaciers retreat they leave behind deep lagoons of glacial melt water - Jokulsarlon is the largest of these lagoons and one of Iceland’s deepest lakes. Icebergs, some as large as houses break off the glacier and gradually drift out to sea – some washing up on the black sand beach nearby – an incredible sight offering excellent photo opportunities.
We finish the day by exploring the small fishing town of Hofn, known for its diverse fishing opportunities. Whilst visiting, consider the economic shift from fishing to tourism, evident from the increasing number of hotels, campsites, marked trails and museums.

Day 4

Neskaupstadur and avalanche barrier - hike to Hengifoss – Fljotsdalsstod - Karahnjukar - Egilsstadir
Start the day driving alongside Vatnajokull, here you will witness impressive views of several glacial tongues feeding off Iceland’s largest icecap. Next explore Neskjaupstadur, a thriving fishing port which also boasts the largest population of any of Iceland’s eastern towns. Here you will also see impressive 17m avalanche barriers. Then take a scenic hike to one of the star attractions of the east, Hengifoss waterfall. Here water flows 128m over brown / black strata which was formed as clay became trapped between successive layers of ash and basalt. There is one more stop of the day before you head back to Egilsstadir, The Karahnjukar dam & the Fjotsdalsstod hydroelectric power plant perfectly demonstrate the importance of harnessing power from natural resources in modern day Iceland. Karahnjukar is part of a complex of dams comprising of one main rockfill dam and several smaller dams. At 700m wide and 198m tall, it is the largest in Iceland. The Fljotsdalsstod hydroelectric power plant has an installed power of 690MW and produces 4,600GWh annually, feeding electricity to the aluminium smelter Fjardaal at Reydarfjordur.

Day 5

Modrudalur – Dettifoss – Namaskard – tour of Lake Myvatn – Nature Baths (Blue Lagoon of the north)
Begin the day by exploring the farm settlement of Modrudalur, at 469m above sea level, this is the highest inhabited place in Iceland. Here, take in the beautiful panoramic views, with sights including the looming Mount Herdubreid, before heading further north to Europe’s most powerful waterfall, Dettifoss. You will in no doubt hear this wonder before you see it as water thunders down at an astonishing 193m³/s cutting a dramatic 20km long gorge into the landscape. Continue to the volcanic region of Myvatn, one of Iceland’s most remarkable places, both for its diversity of geographical features and for its natural beauty. First explore the volcanic activity of Namaskard where hot springs, fumaroles and mud pools boil with relentless energy. Your guide will then take you on a tour of the centrepience of the area, Lake Myvatn, where you will witness bizarre landforms and impressive birdlife . End the day by relaxing in the Nature Baths, where the water is a constant temperature of 38-40°C. Often described as the Blue Lagoon of the north, it is fact a lot quieter and less crowded. The natural surroundings make this a truely unique experience.

Day 6

Egilsstadir – UK - Fly home directly to Gatwick from Egilsstadir

7 Day South, East and North Iceland


Day 1

Fly UK to Keflavik - Reykjavik tour or Reykjanes Peninsula or Blue Lagoon – Reykjavik
Fly from the UK to Keflavik before partaking in a choice of activities. You may like to spend time in Reykjavik sightseeing and shopping or possibly exploring the geothermal wonderland of the Reykjanes Peninsula to see bubbling mud pools and visit the junction in the earth’s crust between the European and American tectonic plates. Or you could simply relax and take a dip in the milky blue geothermal waters of Iceland’s most famous attraction, the Blue Lagoon.

Day 2

Thingvellir – Geysir – Gullfoss – Kerid – Seljalandsfoss – Skogafoss – Vik
Meet your guide before embarking on an adventurous day exploring the Golden Circle and the best of the south of Iceland. First up is the rift valley at Thingvellir, where the divergent North American and Eurasian tectonic plates can be found, pulling apart at an average rate of 2.5cm per year – it is also where Iceland's national assembly, the Althing, was set up in 930AD. Then on to Geysir, where Iceland’s most reliable geyser Strokkur spouts every 5 minutes or so. Nearby, witness the immense power of the two-tiered waterfall Gullfoss, one of Iceland’s most beautiful which flows from a glacier into a rift valley. Continue to Kerid, a dramatic volcanic crater lake, originally believed to have formed by a huge volcanic explosion. More in-depth studies show that Kerid was a cone volcano which erupted and emptied its magma reserve. You’ll then head south and visit Seljalandsfoss, a narrow plunge waterfall where the water plummets over a former sea cliff, far enough away from the bedrock to allow you to walk behind it. Nearby in contrast, Skogar is a broad, block waterfall that thunders 60m over a cliff edge. Continue to black sand beaches and dunes at Vik, where you’ll also be spending the night in farm stay accommodation.

Day 3

Reynishverfi - Fjadrargljufur – Skeidararjokull – Skaftafell National Park – Svinafellsjokull - Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon - Hofn
See the incredible hexagonal basalt columns and impressive cliffs of Reynishverfi. The coastline between here and Dyrholaey is worthy of study with a variety of features including Iceland’s answer to Durdle Door – an immense natural rock arch. Continue to Fjadrargljufur, a rugged and impressive gorge about 100m deep and 2km long. The gorge runs through hyaloclastite (soft, granular rock) with lava intrusions, the entire formation dating from the Ice Age 2 million years ago.
Make a short stop at Skeidararjokull, an outlet glacier of Vatnajokull which has been previously known for its large glacial outburst floods (jokulhlaups) caused by the volcanic activity of the nearby Grisvotn. Next up is Skaftafell National Park, one of Iceland’s primary areas of natural beauty and a geographers wonderland. Here you will get to see some of its many natural features including mountains valleys and glaciers, including the impressive Svinafellsjokull, an outlet glacier where natural ice sculptures, ridges and deep crevasses are abundant. The ice here comes spilling down from the highlands and is known for the particularly active advance and retreat of its glacier tongue. Here you might also like to take part in an optional glacier hike, a nice and less busy alternative to glacier hiking on Solheimajokull.
There will still be time for more adventure and the next stop is at Iceland’s most famous glacial lagoon. As glaciers retreat they leave behind deep lagoons of glacial melt water - Jokulsarlon is the largest of these lagoons and one of Iceland’s deepest lakes. Icebergs, some as large as houses break off the glacier and gradually drift out to sea – some washing up on the black sand beach nearby – an incredible sight offering excellent photo opportunities.
We finish the day by exploring the small fishing town of Hofn, known for its diverse fishing opportunities. Whilst visiting, consider the economic shift from fishing to tourism, evident from the increasing number of hotels, campsites, marked trails and museums.

Day 4

Neskaupstadur and avalanche barrier - hike to Hengifoss – Fljotsdalsstod - Karahnjukar - Egilsstadir
Start the day driving alongside Vatnajokull, here you will witness impressive views of several glacial tongues feeding off Iceland’s largest icecap. Next explore Neskjaupstadur, a thriving fishing port which also boasts the largest population of any of Iceland’s eastern towns. Here you will also see impressive 17m avalanche barriers. Then take a scenic hike to one of the star attractions of the east, Hengifoss waterfall. Here water flows 128m over brown / black strata which was formed as clay became trapped between successive layers of ash and basalt. There is one more stop of the day before you head back to Egilsstadir, The Karahnjukar dam & the Fjotsdalsstod hydroelectric power plant perfectly demonstrate the importance of harnessing power from natural resources in modern day Iceland. Karahnjukar is part of a complex of dams comprising of one main rockfill dam and several smaller dams. At 700m wide and 198m tall, it is the largest in Iceland. The Fljotsdalsstod hydroelectric power plant has an installed power of 690MW and produces 4,600GWh annually, feeding electricity to the aluminium smelter Fjardaal at Reydarfjordur.

Day 5

Modrudalur – Dettifoss – Namaskard – tour of Lake Myvatn – Nature Baths (Blue Lagoon of the north)
Begin the day by exploring the farm settlement of Modrudalur, at 469m above sea level, this is the highest inhabited place in Iceland. Here, take in the beautiful panoramic views, with sights including the looming Mount Herdubreid, before heading further north to Europe’s most powerful waterfall, Dettifoss. You will in no doubt hear this wonder before you see it as water thunders down at an astonishing 193m³/s cutting a dramatic 20km long gorge into the landscape. Continue to the volcanic region of Myvatn, one of Iceland’s most remarkable places, both for its diversity of geographical features and for its natural beauty. First explore the volcanic activity of Namaskard where hot springs, fumaroles and mud pools boil with relentless energy. Your guide will then take you on a tour of the centrepience of the area, Lake Myvatn, where you will witness bizarre landforms and impressive birdlife . End the day by relaxing in the Nature Baths, where the water is a constant temperature of 38-40°C. Often described as the Blue Lagoon of the north, it is fact a lot quieter and less crowded. The natural surroundings make this a truely unique experience.

Day 6

Godafoss – Husavik – Tjornes – Asbyrgi – Myvatn
Start the day by heading west on a short drive to Godafoss, said to be one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Iceland. At 30m wide and with a 12m drop, it is certainly very photogenic. From here head north to Husavik, the whale watching capital of Europe. The town itself is very quaint and beautiful and characteristic of this region. Carry on to the Tjornes Peninsula, one of Iceland’s most remarkable geological locations, known for its fossil layers formed at the end of the Tertiary period. Near to Tjornes you will discover Asbyrgi, a beautiful canyon made up of honeycombed basalt rocks. It is well worth hiking to the bottom of the canyon to marvel at the sheer scale of the rock formation. Finish the day by returning to your accommodation in the Myvatn region.

Day 7

Egilsstadir – UK
Fly home directly to Gatwick from Egilsstadir
This was our first trip to Iceland with Discover the World and we took 57 urban dwellers to the great outdoors. The entire trip blew their minds and they cannot stop talking about it. Discover the World were wonderful at every stage of this mammoth trip.
CM - Bishop Challoner Catholic College
Iceland

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